New Item – Shoulderbag

I finally got my hands on a super cheap bag (actually 2) – if you happen to be in Busan check out their shop. All kind of bags go for 10.000 won (roughly 10 dollar) each. Mine had even a small shoulder-bag included!Both come with zipper + small pocket. [I heavily used both for over 2 months and it’s perfectly in shape as of the first day I bought it]


 10.000 won only
+ made in Korea (!)
+ fake leather but very high quality
+ fits a lot (notebook, some books…)
(shoulder-bag even fits my huge purse, keys and smartphone)

Random – Gokiburi(tale)

So, as you might have read in my other post I’m quite a -souji- (cleaning) lover.
Due to asthma and dust allergy – I already wrote about how to keep those things out of your house (which is quite tricky in Japan; especially on laundry days.)
I got rid of cockroaches, so I thought, but after a nice crispy cold winter they were back again.


Gokiburi-season starts around march/april when the first sun rays warm up your apartment over 20C. I kept thinking and reading and following advice from more experienced japanese people. Here is what I did [»yes, we actually caught a handful huge beasts and made sure they will never enter our apartment again.]

Lavender
the basic advice is “smell”. But it is primarily to prevent “re-appearance
(keep garbage outside, no water-access, use lavender-based air freshener/soaps/oil, clean regularly…)

Poisoned Baits(ホウ酸 ダンゴ)¹
You know beasts are there, but cant find them? Lay out (very affordable) poisoned baits. They work! [» Jump to: Experience]
One important point is those beasts take the poision home, die and as they feed on each other a whole nest will be destroyed (if any) – baits are small and last 6-8 months. Some key-areas where you mostly forget to put them:

  • under/behind kitchen. Japanese basic kitchens are like a set box. Imagine there are holes (sink pipes) where they enter and leave as they please.
    ⇒ open the sink-pipe cover, put a bait and also seal all holes with THIS
  • ‘inside’ (under) your bathtub. Japanese bathtubs are kinda covered with a square-sized frame.
    ⇒ there is one area to access the pipes. Open it, put a bait in and your done.
  • breaker box! Yes, this little plastic thing is connected to all wires which directly leave the wall through a huge hole
    ⇒ ours was big enough to put a bait. If not, keep at least the breaker box hole sealed so they will never be able to leave.
  • kitchen ‘exhaust/range’ hood. In japan unfortunately its simply a hole in the wall covered by a fan.
    ⇒ clean it thoroughly (especially after moving you might find 10 years of pre-owner cooking fat pasted there) and lay a bait on the “outer” area too

Seal, Seal, Seal
Seal holes (after!) putting baits. If you’re the DIY kind of wife, like I am, all you have to do is order “these 3 things². If you’re not, there is this “easy-seal³ – very simple and good for the work you wanna do. [ –removing old seal– part is a bit tricky, but these handy thing will help you (or your husband/boyfriend/person you bribed effectively)]


›REAL LIFE EXPERIENCE‹^
As for our home – I haven’t seen any gokiburi for over a month now. I laid out baits, practically turned over all our kitchen while cleaning with this great “renji cleaner” spray that melts old fat and all you have to do is wipe –brown sauce- off (basically) anything [my kitchen sparkles again *woot woot*]

• Regarding baits, they DO WORK

⋅→ first night. They apparently ate from the baits, as there was fresh poo (black long stains) everywhere in the kitchen (maybe those baits kinda made them not hold it any longer *gross*)
⋅→ second night. I caught a huge beast drinking water, that I didn’t wipe off our sink – but the poison made it less fast (easy catch …for my husband though)
⋅→ third night. we were happily watching our TV show in the living room, when another huge beast walked in kinda bored….as if it wanted to say…(totally high) “yo, folks…kitchen is so dark and silent…wanted to check you guys out here” (another easy catch ….for my hero-husband)
⋅→ forth morning. I check the baits and saw one sitting under our oven in the kitchen…not moving, but still alive (this one had definitely an overdose ….Mr. Cucaracha could just take and dump it with eyes half-closed)
⋅→ the fifth night. was a bit gross as two mega-monster drowned themselves? One in our shower drain (which is covered by a net to prevent hair from plugging the pipes…still a mystery how it got there.) whereas another one was going for a swim in the toilet but too high to leave? (my –now I know why I married you for– husband was pleased about less work)

… hopefully this will be the end of our La Cucaracha- Fairytale.

P.s. as my husband wasn’t aware of the fact:
La Cucaracha is spanish for cockroach.
Yes, it’s not a love song for a girl named cucaracha (korean version!)
↑ that one actually made my day *LOL*


¹[Housan-Dango]^
²[Silicon Remover] [Silicon] [Silicon-Gun] ^
³[Easy-Seal]^

Random -Hands Cafe

Visiting my hospital¹ located in Omotesando did end in finding one of my Top 3 Cafes in Tokyo. Even my husband enjoyed the food there. And in case you are familiar with Tokyo prices you will have the same happy endorphine-like feeling like I had when checking out.

It has a great atmosphere, good reasonable food and though crowded it`s less nosy and suffocating than certain other places.  And [especially for you gluten-free branded people] it has  a delicious desert 1/3 of the original price when you order it as Lunch set

⇒ this desert is  ❤PORN<3
[Whipped cream, Mangos, Mango sauce, Shiratama, Vanilla Icecream, Plums]


[Hands Cafe, Tokyu Plaza Omotesando – Lunch Set with Drink & Desert  1050 yen]

Random – Osouji

There is this thing called “big cleaning” comparable to our “spring cleaning” in Germany. Japanese lead a less ‘sanitary’ life as we tend to do in Germany, so the big cleaning at the end of the year here is a must to make those good new year spirits not run off far away but actually -enter- your home. [I do believe if they would clean their houses like that 2 or 3 times a year, all Japan would feel much more cosy and comfortable.]


I finished all before our big holiday on the Islands (→ Start with this post) so had this “come back into a 200% clean home after a stressy holiday” feeling and spend Xmas together (which, lucky us, is a weekend this year – as you might know that Japanese people don’t get days of for this event.) I even cleaned our entrance and staircase which surprised me the most ⇒ “wow it’s white…when we moved in it was black

•This post reminds me of an older one that I recently updated. DUST in Tokyo. If you like your home to be clean there is the only option to actually clean it everyday. Unfortunately. On the other hand I do enjoy our minimalisic lifestyle even more as it makes cleaning much easier.

Travel – Nikko New Year¹

nikko00d5.jpgThanks to my beloved husband, I was able to experience one of those famous “Onsen” trips. We left cold Tokyo to stay in snowy Nikko for actually 4 days [and thus were nicknamed the “3 nights” couple, as it seems to be not common at all for Japanese to stay longer than 2 nights (average 1)]


After a long train ride, we switched to a bus  or how I would say to a hell-ride along mountaincliffs – last stop “Yunishigawa Onsen “ . Surprisingly there is really “nothing” as such Onsen-towns are located left and right of one big street, so it feels a bit “narrow”. Our -cottage- was so damn cute and (regarding japanese standards) clean. We had one of those huge 10 people tatami rooms, all for ourselves and we even had a private !! onsen [imagine those onsen, outside..hotspring, stones, and people with towels on their heads – exactly same but with nice shower and in/outside area all for us (door could be locked)]

Typically for a Ryoukan is the 100-tiny-plates course, served punctually on time for everyone. Felt a bit like at school first, but after a while it was nice to be able to talk to so many different guests. Overall there is nothing much to do (one of the reasons why people stay not longer than 2 nights) on the other hand that is exactly what we were searching for

Quiet NOTHINGNESS

»Sleeping in long, great breakfast, Onsen, take a walk, have some lunch outside, go to another Onsen lobby have some coffee there, walk back home through the snow, relax, have dinner and enjoy Onsen again before going to your room snuggling into tatami.
— Escaping Tokio Level: PRO —

(My 2 fav. shots – hotel and hubby)


¹[Unfortunately we caught a heavy cold and I couldn’t update since then, which is why some of the emotion got a bit lost in this post.]